Spicy Korean Cold Noodles (10 minutes!) + Intro on Ayurvedic

Spicy Korean Cold Noodles (10 minutes!) + Intro on Ayurvedic

 

I am currently studying Integrative Nutrition and one of the theories I am very interested in is the Ayurvedic concept. It is originally from India and it is a holistic healthy lifestyle that has been practiced for centuries. The concept of Ayurvedic is all about restoring and keeping a physical and emotional balance. Yes please, who doesn’t want that? Each individual is unique and therefore has a different ‘Dosha’.

Which type of dosha and energy is dominant in your life depends on your personality, body type, personal preferences and the environment in which you live. By reading more and doing several tests online, for example here, it came out that I am a Pitta dominant. It is said that everyone has a little bit of all three, but you are mainly one or two types of dosha dominant. If you know which dosha you are, you can also prevent various ailments, outbursts and other negative symptoms. In the Ayurvedic lifestyle, one believes that the type of food you eat, for example, very spicy, too cold, too acidic, this can negatively affect your dosha or positively reinforce it. I guess it’s a great way to prevent those tantrums of our children too. Will report back on this later 🙂

There are 3 different doshas: Vata, Pitta and Kapha. I do not go into it too deeply now, but do not worry, I will do that in a separate post 🙂 If you happen to be a Pitta like me, then it is a good idea to consume cooling, bitter vegetables, such as salads, coconut water, and slightly sweet food, like fruits. Avoid too spicy, sour, salty and dry foods and overly dominant flavors because these flavors bring you out of balance. Think of coffee, chips and fried foods.

Excessive use of the wrong ingredients and type of food can cause digestive problems, anger outbursts, acne, inpatients, heartburn, inflammations just to name a few things. But in balance, and by actually consuming the food that strengthens you, you can concentrate better and have a positive impact on your own life and in your environment.

In this recipe I used cooling cold mung bean noodles (you can substitute this with somen, mihoen, or even spaghetti), combined with fresh spiralized zucchini and the slightly spicy fermented sauce makes this a quick and easy meal for lunch or dinner that I come back for every time. An added benefit of the sauce is that it’s made with the fermented pepper paste called Gochujang, a staple in Korea and in my household. It has the right amount of heat, texture and works with just anything. Feel free to use this sauce for Korean bulgogi, pasta or a smear on your Sourdough toast with some smashed avo on top! Seriously, this sauce is LYFE!

Let me know if you have tried it, would love to hear from you. Happy eating babes!

Korean Spicy Cold Noodles (10 minutes!) + Intro on Ayurvedic
Recipe type: Mains
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pack of cellophane/glass noodles of 250 gram
  • ½ Zucchini, spiralized
  • 4 cherry tomatoes
  • 1 Spring onion
  • Coriander (optional)
  • Sauce:
  • 4 tbsp Gochujang (Korean pepper paste)
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp water
  • 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp toasted white sesame seeds (optional)
Instructions
  1. Soak the noodles in boiled water and let sit until softened for about 10 minutes.
  2. Spiralize the zucchini with a spiralizer, peeler or mandoline and put this in a big salad bowl.
  3. Chop the spring onions finely and add this to the big bowl together with the zucchini.
  4. Make the sauce in the meantime by whisking ingredients together until combined.
  5. Drain the noodles and rinse it off with cold water and add this to the big bowl.
  6. Pour the sauce one spoon at a time in the big salad bowl and stir until everything is well combined. How much sauce you want to add, depends on how spicy you can eat. Feel free to add more if you like it hot!
  7. Use sauce as a condiment for Bibimbap and other Korean dishes. Serve in a small bowl for an extra spoon. Leftovers can be stored in a jar in the fridge up to 2 weeks.



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